You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘cavities’ tag.

Hello Friends!

It’s that time of year again!  And no, I’m not referring to the upcoming holiday season. I’m referring to the end of the dental benefit year.  WooHoo!  Exciting? Hardley.  But it is important.  Why?  For the vast majority of patients with dental insurance, the policies run on a calendar year.

There are exceptions, of course (some government or educational agencies come to mind as examples).  But for the most part, if you don’t use your dental benefits, you lose them.  What does that mean exactly?  Well, when you are given a dental insurance policy, either through your employer or one you purchase yourself, the plan typically covers a set dollar amount, a “maximum” amount you are allowed for the year.  Most plans do not roll over into the next year.  So the benefits you pay premiums for are lost.

Calling to schedule your dental appoinment sooner rather than later will ensure that you will receive the appointment time that works for you.  It will also allow time for the doctor to create a comprehensive treatment plan should you need one and allow time to schedule before the end of the year.  Holidays become very busy in a dental office.  Many people try to take advantage of having time off work or school to schedule, so it may become difficult to schedule.

The good news is that it’s still early enough to schedule.  The bad news is that we can’t help you if you don’t call.

Of course if you have any questions regarding insurance or anything else, we are always happy to help.  We look forward to hearning from you soon:)

Your Friends at

Brunner Prast Family Dental

734.878.3167

http://www.brunnerprastdental.com

 

*This blog is for educational and entertainment purposes only and not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.  If you have any questions or concerns, please consult a healthcare professional.

Hello Friends!

I came across this post and wanted to share.

CHOOSE DENTAL HEALTH. IT’S MUCH CHEAPER.

Wednesday, January 13th, 2016

I recently had a patient cancel her appointment at the last minute. This happens sometimes. It’s frustrating for a dentist or hygienist when we’ve set time aside for a patient and they don’t come. Usually there’s a good reason. In this case, no reason was given.

As I sometimes do…I took it personally. Why did this person choose not to have the treatment done that we discussed? What could I have done better?

This particular patient has been coming to our office for years. She is someone you might describe as “skeptical” of dental treatment. I suspect she had some bad dental experiences before I even came into the picture. She’s at least mildly phobic of dental treatment, too. However, I think she’s probably one of those people that believe that when I come in the room that I’m simply looking for work to do, probably to line my pockets.

-Do I really need this crown--It’s a difficult spot for a dentist. Often times we’re both the internist that diagnoses the problem and the surgeon that fixes it. Patient see this as a conflict of interest. The guy who is telling me that I have cavities is also the guy who benefits from them being fixed. I completely understand this. I take my role as a doctor very seriously and I put my patient’s needs first. But can you blame a patient for being skeptical of a doctor’s motivations?

When I examine a patient I’m looking to see what level of dental health the patient has. And when I see a problem, I’m obliged to tell them about it. I have found what I believe is the most effective way to do this. I do all of my recall exams with a dental operating microscope. This microscope magnifies what I can see and has a very bright light that allows me to see parts of the mouth that don’t get lit up very often. I’ve attached an HD camera to the microscope with a monitor mounted over the patient to allow them to see exactly what I’m seeing…as I see it. I feel like this is a great solution to the problem of showing the patient what I see instead of me just describing it. I like it more than still photos because I can show it to them “live” as I’m describing it.

blog post scopeBack to my patient that chose not to come in today. I definitely examined her with the microscope and I definitely showed her what I was seeing. I recommended to some treatment because I saw some problems. I try and do this dispassionately. I try not to “sell” a patient on treatment by showing them what I’m seeing. I try to help the patient choose dental health by showing them what I’m seeing and describing what we can do to correct dental problems.

I have a suspicion that this patient still thinks what I’m describing isn’t a real problem. Like many dental problems, what I’m describing probably doesn’t hurt. Most cavities don’t hurt. Gum disease almost never hurts. Even broken teeth often aren’t painful. If you use pain as the threshold for dental treatment, you’re probably going to end up choosing the most expensive way to fix the problem or worse, sometimes the problem can’t be fixed leading to the loss of a tooth. A small cavity left untreated almost always becomes a bigger cavity, so what may have been easy to fix with a filling could end up needing a crown or even a root canal. This sounds like a scare tactic used by a dentist. Ask any dentist and they’ll explain that they see it. All. The. Time.

So I’m going to suggest that you listen to your dentist’s recommendation. The choice to treat is always yours. But almost always, the sooner you treat a problem, the less expensive and potentially painful the fix is.

The above post was from Dr. Alan Mead at Mead Family Dental and can be found at the following link:

http://meadfamilydental.com/2016/01/choose-dental-health-its-much-cheaper/?utm_content=buffer76438&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_campaign=buffer.

Have you ever had difficulty deciding to complete your dental treatment?  Do you have confidence in your dental practice?  What are your biggest concerns making the decision? I’d love to hear your thoughts.

Yours in good dental health,

Brunner Prast Family Dental

http://www.brunnerprastdental.com

 

The oral health information on this website is intended for educational purposes only. You should always consult a licensed dentist or other qualified health care professional for any questions concerning your oral health.

Hello Friends!

Are you a “sipper”?  Do you have that delicious icy cold lemonade or sweet iced tea by your side all day long?  Maybe it’s that refreshing Coke or Pepsi by your side to quench that thirst.  Or maybe it’s that energy or sports drink you’re sipping.  Whatever you choose, unless it is plain water, it is important to remember not to sip continuously throughout the day.  The continuous exposure to the sugar and acids in these drinks makes a perfect environment for decay.

If you choose to drink these beverages, finish them in a short amount of time and rinse with water to minimize the risk for decay.

Sports Drinks info graphic

Have a great summer!!

Your friends at Brunner Prast Family Dental

http://www.brunnerprastdental.com

 

 

 

Hello Friends

Did you ever know someone who seemed to get cavities no matter how often they brushed?  We found this article in Women’s Health magazine with some insight that might be helpful.

Why Some People Are More Prone to Cavities Than Others

Macaela Mackenzie September 23, 2015

If you brush and floss regularly, you won’t get cavities, right? Wrong. Good dental hygiene is great, but it doesn’t necessarily have anything to do with your proclivity for cavities. Instead, you can thank your diet and your DNA.

“The brushing and flossing mantra has been used for a long, long time, but if you look at controlled clinical studies, very few show a reduction in cavities,” says dentist Page Caufield, Ph.D., who studies tooth decay at the University of Michigan Dental School. “Brushing and flossing is not going to prevent cavities.”

Say what? If there’s no scientific proof to back up the claim that brushing and flossing actually prevents cavities, why are we getting them?

The simplest answer is sugar.

“Tooth decay is completely and totally correlated to the introduction of sugar to western countries,” says Caufield. “If you cut off the sugar, you’ll cut off the cavities.”

Cavities are caused when the bacteria in our bodies break down sugars. When these bacteria chow down on sucrose, they can get into existing crevices in our teeth and cause decay in the process. So as long as you’re consuming sugar, you’re leaving yourself susceptible to them.

And some of us might be more likely to succumb to the nasty effects of sugar than others. “There is a genetic component that accounts for about one third of cavities that’s related to the shape of your teeth and the amount of saliva you have,” says Caufield.

Cavities are formed when two things combine: the bacterial process of fermenting the sugar and an existing hole or fissure in the tooth. Some of us tend to have crevices in the surface of our teeth that are naturally deep. And even though this is fairly normal, it makes it all more easy for bacteria to drill down and cause a cavity.

If you learn that this is the case for you, Caufield recommends looking into sealants, a simple procedure where a dentist will seal off those deep crevices in your teeth to prevent bacteria and sugar from getting in there.

And even though there’s no scientific proof that brushing your teeth right after snacking on something sweet will keep the cavities away, it can’t hurt. And not flossing has been linked to an increase in inflammation that can lead to heart disease, so you shouldn’t skip out on this daily habit either.

“If you use a toothpaste with fluoride in it, you’ll get a modest reduction in cavities of about 20 percent,” says Caufield, who also notes that brushing with non-fluoride toothpaste won’t do a thing for your tooth decay.

So if you can’t skip the sugar, keep a pocket-sized tube of fluoride toothpaste within reach for a post-bite brushing.

***********************************************************

There are probably many variables that contribute to the formation of cavities, but there definitely appears to be a link to sugar.  The above information is a good start at common sense solutions.

If you have any dental questions or concerns, please contact our office.  We’ll be glad to help:)

Yours in good dental health,

Brunner Prast Family Dental

http://www.brunnerprastdental.com

** The above information is not intended to treat or diagnose any condition or disease.  Please consult a doctor if you have questions specific to your condition.

Hello Friends

I found an article by Robert Raible on the ADA website and the facts listed are troubling:

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention this week released statistics on the high prevalence of dental caries (cavities) among U.S. adults, and the numbers are sobering.  Ninety-one percent of Americans over 20 have had cavities at some point in their lives. Notably, the agency reports that 27 percent of adults over 20 have untreated caries.

“Despite all the advances in our ability to prevent, detect and treat dental disease, too many Americans—for a variety of reasons—are not enjoying the best possible oral health,” said ADA President Dr. Maxine Feinberg.

Dr. Feinberg noted the substantially greater rates of untreated disease among African Americans (42 percent) and Hispanics (36 percent), saying, “The disproportionate rates of disease among some minorities is particularly disturbing and underscores the need for greater outreach to these underserved populations.”

According to the ADA Health Policy Institute, dental care utilization in 2012 was at its lowest level among working age adults since the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey began tracking dental care use in 1996. Adults who do not plan to visit a dentist in the next 12 months most frequently cite cost and the belief that they do not need dental care as reasons.   

Responding to the continued need to improve the nation’s oral health, the ADA in 2013 launched Action for Dental Health, a nationwide, community-based movement to provide care now to people who already suffer from untreated disease, strengthen and expand the public/private safety net and increase dental health education and disease prevention.

Dr. Feinberg emphasized the ADA’s belief that prevention is the ultimate answer to eliminating the vast majority of dental disease.

“We know that prevention works.  While it is critical to treat disease that has already occurred, the public health community needs to increase its focus on proven means of preventing it,” she said.  “Community water fluoridation, sealant programs for children, teaching people how to take care of their families’ teeth and gums, and getting the greatest possible number of children and adults into dental homes are the keys to better oral health for everyone.

“We are doubling down, and we urge the broader health care community, federal, state and local officials, the private sector—everyone with a stake in a healthier, more productive nation—to join us.”

Hopefully, consistent patient education and community dental programs will continue to make people aware of the seriousness of gum disease and tooth decay, inspiring people to take action.  Our office strives to make patient education a priority. Our hygienists and doctors routinely visit schools, beginning at the pre-school level and participate in community events to speak to the public and to distribute educational materials about disease treatment and prevention.  We see the effects of dental neglect on a person’s overall health on a daily basis, and make it our mission to spread the word.

If you have questions or need information regarding your dental care, please feel free to contact the office and we will be happy to help.  Visit http://www.brunnerfamilydental.com

Until next time

Your friends at Brunner Family Dental

About the ADA

The not-for-profit ADA is the nation’s largest dental association, representing 158,000 dentist members. The premier source of oral health information, the ADA has advocated for the public’s health and promoted the art and science of dentistry since 1859. The ADA’s state-of-the-art research facilities develop and test dental products and materials that have advanced the practice of dentistry and made the patient experience more positive. The ADA Seal of Acceptance long has been a valuable and respected guide to consumer dental care products. The monthly The Journal of the American Dental Association (JADA) is the ADA’s flagship publication and the best-read scientific journal in dentistry. For more information about the ADA, visit ADA.org. For more information on oral health, including prevention, care and treatment of dental disease, visit the ADA’s consumer website MouthHealthy.org