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Hello Friends!

Do you struggle getting your kids to brush their teeth?

As a parent, you may have more in common with your dentist than you think. Many moms and dads—even dentists—struggle to keep their children’s mouths and teeth clean. ADA dentist Dr. Gene Romo is a father of four – ages 13, 10, 8 and 2. “As you can imagine, there can be a wide range of behavior on who wants to brush and who doesn’t in our house,” he says. “I’m not just a dentist, I’m their dad, so making sure they’re establishing good habits early on is important to me.”

To keep your family’s smiles strong, try some of tricks of the trade from dentist moms and dads:

Establish a Fun Family Routine

In Dr. Romo’s house, there’s one rule everyone follows: “You have to brush before bed, and you can’t leave the house in the morning until you brush,” he says. “The most important thing is to make sure your family is brushing for 2 minutes, twice a day.”

Young kids love to imitate their parents, so take the opportunity to lead by example. “One thing I did with all my kids was play a game with them, kind of like monkey-see, monkey-do. We all have our toothbrushes, and they follow what I do,” he says. “When I open my mouth, they open their mouths. When I start brushing my front teeth, they start brushing their front teeth – and so on all the way until it’s time to rinse and spit. It’s just a fun way to teach them how to brush properly, and we get to spend a little time together, too.”

Making brushing a family affair also helps you keep an eye out for healthy habits. “Some kids want to do everything themselves, even toothpaste, so you can watch to make sure they’re not using more than they should – a rice-sized smear for kids 2 and under and a drop the size of a pea for kids 3 and up,” he says. “You can also do a quick final check for any leftover food when brush time is done.”

Try a New Angle

When her daughter was only 6 months old, ADA dentist Dr. Ruchi Sahota asked her husband to hold her while she brushed or brushed when her daughter was laying down. “You can see their teeth from front to back the best at that time,” she says.

If your child is old enough to stand and wants to brush in the bathroom, ADA dentist Dr. Richard Price suggests a different method. “Stand behind your child and have him or her look up at you,” he says. “This causes the mouth to hang open and allows you to help them brush more easily.”

Bigger Kids, Bigger Challenges

Checking up on your child’s daily dental hygiene habits doesn’t end as they get older. It’s more challenging when they get their driver’s license and head off to college, says ADA dentist Dr. Maria Lopez Howell. “The new drivers can drive through any fast food spot for the kinds of food and beverages that they can’t find in a health-minded home,” she says. “The new college student is up late either studying or socializing. They don’t have a nightly routine, so they may be more likely to fall asleep without brushing.”

While your children are still at home, check in on their brushing and talk to them about healthy eating, especially when it comes to sugary drinks or beverages that are acidic. After they leave the nest, encourage good dental habits through care packages with toothbrushes, toothpaste or interdental cleaners like floss with the ADA Seal of Acceptance. And when they’re home on break, make sure they get to the dentist for regular checkups! Or if school break is too hectic– you can find a dentist near campus to make sure they are able to keep up with their regular visits.

Play Detective…

As your children get older, they’re probably taking care of their teeth away from your watchful eye. Dr. Romo asks his older children if they’ve brushed, but if he thinks he needs to check up on them, he will check to see if their toothbrushes are wet. “There have been times that toothbrush was bone dry,” he says. “Then I’ll go back to them and say, ‘OK, it’s time to do it together.’”

If you think your child has caught on and is just running their toothbrush under water, go one step further. “I’ll say, ‘Let me smell your breath so I can smell the toothpaste,’” he says. “It all goes back to establishing that routine and holding your child accountable.”

…And Save the Evidence

It could be as simple as a piece of used floss. It sounds gross, but this tactic has actually helped Dr. Lopez Howell encourage teens to maintain good dental habits throughout high school and college.

To remind them about the importance of flossing, Dr. Lopez Howell will ask her teenage patients to floss their teeth and then have them smell the actual floss. If the floss smells bad, she reminds them that their mouth must smell the same way. “It’s an ‘ah-ha’ moment,” Dr. Lopez Howell explains. “They do not want to have bad breath, especially once they see how removing the smelly plaque might improve their social life!”

Above All, Don’t Give Up

If getting your child to just stand at the sink for two minutes feels like its own accomplishment (much less brush), you’re not alone. “It was so difficult to help my daughter to brush her teeth because she resisted big time,” says ADA dentist Dr. Alice Boghosian. Just remember to keep your cool and remain persistent.

“Eventually, brushing became a pleasure,” Dr. Boghosian says. She advises parents to set a good example by brushing with their children. “Once your child is brushing on their own, they will feel a sense of accomplishment – and you will too!”

The above information was taken from the ADA website Mouthhealthy.org.

As always, if you have any questions or need more information, we would be happy to help!  Visit our website at www.brunnerprastdental.com.

Yours in good dental health:)

Brunner Prast Family Dental

brunner-prast-family-dental-smiling-family

Hello Friends!

It’s that time of year again.  Time to reflect, make resolutions and to renew promises you may have made to yourself.  Did you resolve to quit smoking? Exercise or eat healthier? Spend more time with family?  Become more organized? While these are all pretty common and worthwhile goals, I would encourage you to also add “Take care of your dental health” to that list.

Why?  It’s certainly easier to put your dental health and keeping dental checkups at the bottom of a long to-do list.  Unless you have a raging tooth ache, it can be a low priority. But like most things, if you keep putting off preventive care, eventually things will begin to deteriorate.  And your oral health is not an exception.  Of course your dentist checks for things like cavities, but also things a misaligned bite, worn down or cracking teeth which could indicate tooth grinding, or early warning signs of oral cancer.  Detected early, most problems can be easily treated.

If there are specific concerns that cause you to postpone treatment and or preventive care, your dental office should be able to work with you to find a solution.  Cost a concern?  Ask about patient financing and how to maximize your insurance benefits.  Time constraints an issue?  Ask about early or late appointments.  Most offices will be happy to find a time that works with your schedule.  Are you fearful?  Ask for a complimentary consultation to discuss specifics to your treatment.  Many offices will offer items to help you relax or help you become comfortable.  Whatever your concern, a good office will help you to overcome it.

Should you ever have questions of concerns, please visit our website at http://www.brunnerprastdental.com or feel free to give us a call.

Wishing you and yours a Happy and Healthy 2017:)

Your friends at Brunner Prast Family Dental

Hello Friends!

You’ve probably heard that it’s not normal for your gums to bleed.  Or that you should brush and floss at least twice a day.  And rinse with a fluoride mouthwash.  And see your dentist for a professional cleaning and exam every six months.  And stay away from sugary foods and beverages.  And avoid highly acidic foods.  The list goes on and on!  But life is busy!  You’re rushing out the door in the morning and often fall into bed exhausted at night.  Like so many other things that are good for our health, it can become easy to fall into the “I’ll do it tomorrow” trap.  But, much like other aspects of our health, dental neglect will begin to show warning signs.  Often one of the first is bleeding gums.  If your toothbrush bristles are always pink when you brush or the water you spit into the sink afterwards is tinged with blood, that’s probably an indicator of mild gum disease or gingivitis.  Your gums bleed because they are swollen, inflamed and irritated by the bacteria that has hardened into plaque. Left untreated, gingivitis can progress into periodontal disease.

Aside from the obvious negative oral side effects (bad breath, cavities, tooth and bone loss) of periodontal disease, there have been numerous studies linking periodontal disease to overall health problems.  According to the ADA, the harmful bacteria that is in your mouth can travel to other parts of your body and has been linked to the increased risk of heart disease, diabetes and stroke.

The only way to truly maintain good oral health is to brush and floss your teeth regularly and see your dental professional every six – twelve months.  Like most things, catching problems early is the best way to avoid more serious problems and potentially  more expensive treatment later.

So as hard as it may be to add more things to your ever-growing “to-do” list, it is so important to take care of yourself and make time to brush and floss!

Yours in good dental health

Your friends at

Brunner Prast Family Dental

http://www.brunnerprastdental.com