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Hello Friends!

Do you struggle getting your kids to brush their teeth?

As a parent, you may have more in common with your dentist than you think. Many moms and dads—even dentists—struggle to keep their children’s mouths and teeth clean. ADA dentist Dr. Gene Romo is a father of four – ages 13, 10, 8 and 2. “As you can imagine, there can be a wide range of behavior on who wants to brush and who doesn’t in our house,” he says. “I’m not just a dentist, I’m their dad, so making sure they’re establishing good habits early on is important to me.”

To keep your family’s smiles strong, try some of tricks of the trade from dentist moms and dads:

Establish a Fun Family Routine

In Dr. Romo’s house, there’s one rule everyone follows: “You have to brush before bed, and you can’t leave the house in the morning until you brush,” he says. “The most important thing is to make sure your family is brushing for 2 minutes, twice a day.”

Young kids love to imitate their parents, so take the opportunity to lead by example. “One thing I did with all my kids was play a game with them, kind of like monkey-see, monkey-do. We all have our toothbrushes, and they follow what I do,” he says. “When I open my mouth, they open their mouths. When I start brushing my front teeth, they start brushing their front teeth – and so on all the way until it’s time to rinse and spit. It’s just a fun way to teach them how to brush properly, and we get to spend a little time together, too.”

Making brushing a family affair also helps you keep an eye out for healthy habits. “Some kids want to do everything themselves, even toothpaste, so you can watch to make sure they’re not using more than they should – a rice-sized smear for kids 2 and under and a drop the size of a pea for kids 3 and up,” he says. “You can also do a quick final check for any leftover food when brush time is done.”

Try a New Angle

When her daughter was only 6 months old, ADA dentist Dr. Ruchi Sahota asked her husband to hold her while she brushed or brushed when her daughter was laying down. “You can see their teeth from front to back the best at that time,” she says.

If your child is old enough to stand and wants to brush in the bathroom, ADA dentist Dr. Richard Price suggests a different method. “Stand behind your child and have him or her look up at you,” he says. “This causes the mouth to hang open and allows you to help them brush more easily.”

Bigger Kids, Bigger Challenges

Checking up on your child’s daily dental hygiene habits doesn’t end as they get older. It’s more challenging when they get their driver’s license and head off to college, says ADA dentist Dr. Maria Lopez Howell. “The new drivers can drive through any fast food spot for the kinds of food and beverages that they can’t find in a health-minded home,” she says. “The new college student is up late either studying or socializing. They don’t have a nightly routine, so they may be more likely to fall asleep without brushing.”

While your children are still at home, check in on their brushing and talk to them about healthy eating, especially when it comes to sugary drinks or beverages that are acidic. After they leave the nest, encourage good dental habits through care packages with toothbrushes, toothpaste or interdental cleaners like floss with the ADA Seal of Acceptance. And when they’re home on break, make sure they get to the dentist for regular checkups! Or if school break is too hectic– you can find a dentist near campus to make sure they are able to keep up with their regular visits.

Play Detective…

As your children get older, they’re probably taking care of their teeth away from your watchful eye. Dr. Romo asks his older children if they’ve brushed, but if he thinks he needs to check up on them, he will check to see if their toothbrushes are wet. “There have been times that toothbrush was bone dry,” he says. “Then I’ll go back to them and say, ‘OK, it’s time to do it together.’”

If you think your child has caught on and is just running their toothbrush under water, go one step further. “I’ll say, ‘Let me smell your breath so I can smell the toothpaste,’” he says. “It all goes back to establishing that routine and holding your child accountable.”

…And Save the Evidence

It could be as simple as a piece of used floss. It sounds gross, but this tactic has actually helped Dr. Lopez Howell encourage teens to maintain good dental habits throughout high school and college.

To remind them about the importance of flossing, Dr. Lopez Howell will ask her teenage patients to floss their teeth and then have them smell the actual floss. If the floss smells bad, she reminds them that their mouth must smell the same way. “It’s an ‘ah-ha’ moment,” Dr. Lopez Howell explains. “They do not want to have bad breath, especially once they see how removing the smelly plaque might improve their social life!”

Above All, Don’t Give Up

If getting your child to just stand at the sink for two minutes feels like its own accomplishment (much less brush), you’re not alone. “It was so difficult to help my daughter to brush her teeth because she resisted big time,” says ADA dentist Dr. Alice Boghosian. Just remember to keep your cool and remain persistent.

“Eventually, brushing became a pleasure,” Dr. Boghosian says. She advises parents to set a good example by brushing with their children. “Once your child is brushing on their own, they will feel a sense of accomplishment – and you will too!”

The above information was taken from the ADA website Mouthhealthy.org.

As always, if you have any questions or need more information, we would be happy to help!  Visit our website at www.brunnerprastdental.com.

Yours in good dental health:)

Brunner Prast Family Dental

Hello Friends!

You’ve probably heard that it’s not normal for your gums to bleed.  Or that you should brush and floss at least twice a day.  And rinse with a fluoride mouthwash.  And see your dentist for a professional cleaning and exam every six months.  And stay away from sugary foods and beverages.  And avoid highly acidic foods.  The list goes on and on!  But life is busy!  You’re rushing out the door in the morning and often fall into bed exhausted at night.  Like so many other things that are good for our health, it can become easy to fall into the “I’ll do it tomorrow” trap.  But, much like other aspects of our health, dental neglect will begin to show warning signs.  Often one of the first is bleeding gums.  If your toothbrush bristles are always pink when you brush or the water you spit into the sink afterwards is tinged with blood, that’s probably an indicator of mild gum disease or gingivitis.  Your gums bleed because they are swollen, inflamed and irritated by the bacteria that has hardened into plaque. Left untreated, gingivitis can progress into periodontal disease.

Aside from the obvious negative oral side effects (bad breath, cavities, tooth and bone loss) of periodontal disease, there have been numerous studies linking periodontal disease to overall health problems.  According to the ADA, the harmful bacteria that is in your mouth can travel to other parts of your body and has been linked to the increased risk of heart disease, diabetes and stroke.

The only way to truly maintain good oral health is to brush and floss your teeth regularly and see your dental professional every six – twelve months.  Like most things, catching problems early is the best way to avoid more serious problems and potentially  more expensive treatment later.

So as hard as it may be to add more things to your ever-growing “to-do” list, it is so important to take care of yourself and make time to brush and floss!

Yours in good dental health

Your friends at

Brunner Prast Family Dental

http://www.brunnerprastdental.com

Hello Friends!

Have you ever wondered where to start when searching for a dentist?  Referrals from friends or co-workers are pretty common, as are insurance lists, but have you considered your local dental association?  The Michigan Dental Association website has a lot of useful information, including some great questions to ask during that initial phone call.

Questions to Ask a Dentist

Now that you’ve used the Find a Dentist search to locate a list of Michigan Dental Association dentists in your area, you need to narrow it down to the one dentist who is your family’s perfect match. Here’s a list of questions to help you make your decision.

  • Are the office hours convenient for your schedule?
  • Is the dental office close to your home or office?
  • Does the office appear to be clean, neat and well organized?
  • How are dental emergencies handled?
  • Does the office staff appear to be friendly and helpful?
  • What is the office policy for rescheduling an appointment?
  • What is the policy on fees and payment plans?
  • Does the dental office staff explain ways to help prevent dental problems?
  • Does the office have dental health education materials available?

Since a good relationship with your dentist is essential to good oral health care, take your time and choose one that you and your family feel comfortable with so you can arrive for each visit with a smile.

 

I would add that visiting the office for a tour prior to scheduling or arranging a visit to meet the doctor are great ideas.  A reputable office will usually be happy to schedule a brief, complimentary  consultation with the doctor to make sure you are comfortable with him or her and with the office in general.  You should be made to feel comfortable asking questions or expressing concerns.

Hope the above information helps:)

Your friends at

Brunner Prast Family Dental

 

 

*The above article was referenced from the following:

Hello Friends

I found an article by Robert Raible on the ADA website and the facts listed are troubling:

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention this week released statistics on the high prevalence of dental caries (cavities) among U.S. adults, and the numbers are sobering.  Ninety-one percent of Americans over 20 have had cavities at some point in their lives. Notably, the agency reports that 27 percent of adults over 20 have untreated caries.

“Despite all the advances in our ability to prevent, detect and treat dental disease, too many Americans—for a variety of reasons—are not enjoying the best possible oral health,” said ADA President Dr. Maxine Feinberg.

Dr. Feinberg noted the substantially greater rates of untreated disease among African Americans (42 percent) and Hispanics (36 percent), saying, “The disproportionate rates of disease among some minorities is particularly disturbing and underscores the need for greater outreach to these underserved populations.”

According to the ADA Health Policy Institute, dental care utilization in 2012 was at its lowest level among working age adults since the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey began tracking dental care use in 1996. Adults who do not plan to visit a dentist in the next 12 months most frequently cite cost and the belief that they do not need dental care as reasons.   

Responding to the continued need to improve the nation’s oral health, the ADA in 2013 launched Action for Dental Health, a nationwide, community-based movement to provide care now to people who already suffer from untreated disease, strengthen and expand the public/private safety net and increase dental health education and disease prevention.

Dr. Feinberg emphasized the ADA’s belief that prevention is the ultimate answer to eliminating the vast majority of dental disease.

“We know that prevention works.  While it is critical to treat disease that has already occurred, the public health community needs to increase its focus on proven means of preventing it,” she said.  “Community water fluoridation, sealant programs for children, teaching people how to take care of their families’ teeth and gums, and getting the greatest possible number of children and adults into dental homes are the keys to better oral health for everyone.

“We are doubling down, and we urge the broader health care community, federal, state and local officials, the private sector—everyone with a stake in a healthier, more productive nation—to join us.”

Hopefully, consistent patient education and community dental programs will continue to make people aware of the seriousness of gum disease and tooth decay, inspiring people to take action.  Our office strives to make patient education a priority. Our hygienists and doctors routinely visit schools, beginning at the pre-school level and participate in community events to speak to the public and to distribute educational materials about disease treatment and prevention.  We see the effects of dental neglect on a person’s overall health on a daily basis, and make it our mission to spread the word.

If you have questions or need information regarding your dental care, please feel free to contact the office and we will be happy to help.  Visit http://www.brunnerfamilydental.com

Until next time

Your friends at Brunner Family Dental

About the ADA

The not-for-profit ADA is the nation’s largest dental association, representing 158,000 dentist members. The premier source of oral health information, the ADA has advocated for the public’s health and promoted the art and science of dentistry since 1859. The ADA’s state-of-the-art research facilities develop and test dental products and materials that have advanced the practice of dentistry and made the patient experience more positive. The ADA Seal of Acceptance long has been a valuable and respected guide to consumer dental care products. The monthly The Journal of the American Dental Association (JADA) is the ADA’s flagship publication and the best-read scientific journal in dentistry. For more information about the ADA, visit ADA.org. For more information on oral health, including prevention, care and treatment of dental disease, visit the ADA’s consumer website MouthHealthy.org