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Hello Friends

I found an article by Robert Raible on the ADA website and the facts listed are troubling:

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention this week released statistics on the high prevalence of dental caries (cavities) among U.S. adults, and the numbers are sobering.  Ninety-one percent of Americans over 20 have had cavities at some point in their lives. Notably, the agency reports that 27 percent of adults over 20 have untreated caries.

“Despite all the advances in our ability to prevent, detect and treat dental disease, too many Americans—for a variety of reasons—are not enjoying the best possible oral health,” said ADA President Dr. Maxine Feinberg.

Dr. Feinberg noted the substantially greater rates of untreated disease among African Americans (42 percent) and Hispanics (36 percent), saying, “The disproportionate rates of disease among some minorities is particularly disturbing and underscores the need for greater outreach to these underserved populations.”

According to the ADA Health Policy Institute, dental care utilization in 2012 was at its lowest level among working age adults since the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey began tracking dental care use in 1996. Adults who do not plan to visit a dentist in the next 12 months most frequently cite cost and the belief that they do not need dental care as reasons.   

Responding to the continued need to improve the nation’s oral health, the ADA in 2013 launched Action for Dental Health, a nationwide, community-based movement to provide care now to people who already suffer from untreated disease, strengthen and expand the public/private safety net and increase dental health education and disease prevention.

Dr. Feinberg emphasized the ADA’s belief that prevention is the ultimate answer to eliminating the vast majority of dental disease.

“We know that prevention works.  While it is critical to treat disease that has already occurred, the public health community needs to increase its focus on proven means of preventing it,” she said.  “Community water fluoridation, sealant programs for children, teaching people how to take care of their families’ teeth and gums, and getting the greatest possible number of children and adults into dental homes are the keys to better oral health for everyone.

“We are doubling down, and we urge the broader health care community, federal, state and local officials, the private sector—everyone with a stake in a healthier, more productive nation—to join us.”

Hopefully, consistent patient education and community dental programs will continue to make people aware of the seriousness of gum disease and tooth decay, inspiring people to take action.  Our office strives to make patient education a priority. Our hygienists and doctors routinely visit schools, beginning at the pre-school level and participate in community events to speak to the public and to distribute educational materials about disease treatment and prevention.  We see the effects of dental neglect on a person’s overall health on a daily basis, and make it our mission to spread the word.

If you have questions or need information regarding your dental care, please feel free to contact the office and we will be happy to help.  Visit http://www.brunnerfamilydental.com

Until next time

Your friends at Brunner Family Dental

About the ADA

The not-for-profit ADA is the nation’s largest dental association, representing 158,000 dentist members. The premier source of oral health information, the ADA has advocated for the public’s health and promoted the art and science of dentistry since 1859. The ADA’s state-of-the-art research facilities develop and test dental products and materials that have advanced the practice of dentistry and made the patient experience more positive. The ADA Seal of Acceptance long has been a valuable and respected guide to consumer dental care products. The monthly The Journal of the American Dental Association (JADA) is the ADA’s flagship publication and the best-read scientific journal in dentistry. For more information about the ADA, visit ADA.org. For more information on oral health, including prevention, care and treatment of dental disease, visit the ADA’s consumer website MouthHealthy.org

Hello Friends!

“Why do I need x-rays? I brush my teeth”.

Sometimes we hear this question in our office, so I’d like to share some thoughts on the subject.

Dental x-rays are necessary for the following:

To check for decay between the teeth 

Often, decay isn’t visible to the naked eye, and exists in areas that dentists cannot see.

To check for bone loss associated with gum disease 

Gum disease can cause bone loss and an x-ray can determine how advanced it is.

To check for decay under current dental restorations

Sometimes, decay can occur under fillings and crowns and can only be seen with an x-ray.

To look for an infection at the tip of the root

Infections can occur at the very bottom of the tooth where the bone is (sometimes without causing any obvious symptoms) and an x-ray will show any abnormalities.

To examine an area prior to dental procedures

Dentists need a full view of the tooth and bone.

To check for abnormalities in the bone/sinus area

A dental x-ray can detect unusual masses or other areas of concern undetectable to the naked eye.

The most common concern expressed by a patient is the amount of radiation they are exposed to during a dental x-ray.  Any questions or concerns should be discussed with your dentist or hygienist.  Another good source of information is the American Dental Association.  You can visit their website at http://www.ada.org for breakdowns and dental x-ray recommendations.

As always, if we can answer any questions or help in any way, please visit our website at http://www.brunnerfamilydental.com.

Your friends at Brunner Family Dental

Hello Friends!

We often receive questions regarding dental x-rays; “Are they necessary?”, “Are they safe?”, and “Why do I need so many?” are typically the most common.  We found this great article from Delta Dental that had some great information from the ADA regarding dental x-rays.

All about x-rays

X-rays explained

Dental x-rays are a valuable part of dental treatment because they can detect damage to teeth and gums not visible during a routine checkup.

X-rays can show the condition of your teeth, their roots, your jaw placement and the overall composition of your facial bones. X-rays can help your dentist determine the presence or degree of gum disease, cavities, abscesses and many abnormal growths, such as cysts and tumors. X-rays also can show the exact location of impacted teeth and teeth that have not yet fully developed.

X-ray Q&A

Do all patients have x-rays taken every six months?

X-ray schedules are customized to fit your individual needs. If you are a new patient, your dentist will typically take x-rays to evaluate your oral health and track it during future visits, making sure that your teeth and gums stay healthy. If you have changed dentists and recently had x-rays taken, you can ask to have them sent to the new dentist so he or she is up-to-date on your oral health.

What kind of x-rays does my dentist usually take?

The most common type of x-rays dentists take are known as bitewing x-rays. These require patients to hold or bite down on a piece of plastic with x-ray film in the center. Bitewing x-rays typically determine the presence of decay in between teeth – one of the most common areas where decay-causing bacteria reside.

Periapical x-rays are another common type of dental x-ray, which gives the dentist an image of the entire tooth, including the roots. With periapical x-rays, dentists evaluate a particular tooth’s root structure and bone level, and also can detect cysts and abscesses.

My dentist has ordered a “panoramic radiograph.” What is that?

A panoramic x-ray, also called radiograph, allows your dentist to see your whole mouth, including your upper and lower teeth and parts of your jaw, in a single image. This gives him or her a clear image of any issues that may be harder to see up close. It can help predict children’s tooth development and may show complications with a teenager’s wisdom teeth before they erupt.

Why might I need more than one type of x-ray?

Different types of x-rays give your dentist an overview of different parts of your mouth. Panoramic x-rays give your dentist a general comprehensive view of your entire mouth on a single film, while bitewing or periapical x-rays show a detailed image of a smaller area, revealing decay or cavities between teeth. If your dentist needs both these vantage points to assess a problem, he or she will likely conduct multiple x-rays.

Should I be concerned about exposure to radiation?

All health care providers are sensitive to patients’ concerns about radiation. Your dentist has been trained to prescribe x-rays only when they are appropriate, and to tailor their frequency to your individual needs. By using state-of-the-art technology and staying knowledgeable about recent advances, your dentist knows which techniques, procedures and x-ray films can minimize your exposure to radiation.1

 

If you have any other questions or need more info, please visit our website at http://www.brunnerfamilydental.com.  We’ll be happy to discuss your individual concerns.

Your friends at

Brunner Family Dental

The oral health information on this website is intended for educational purposes only. You should always consult a licensed dentist or other qualified health care professional for any questions concerning your oral health.

Hello Friends!
What’s your New Year’s Resolution for 2015? Now that the calendar has officially turned to 2015, you may have already come up with a resolution – and hopefully you haven’t given up on it yet! If you haven’t come up with one yet, how about rededicating yourself to taking care of your mouth, teeth and gums? It’s a resolution that will pay dividends for your health and your smile for a lifetime.

While it’s not always easy to follow your resolution throughout the year, this year, resolve to achieve one of these easy, yet effective, oral health goals. Understanding the benefits of your particular resolutions can be motivating and rewarding. Whatever your goals might be, it is important to take small steps to achieve them. Remember: consistency is key with any resolution that you make!

Take the right steps!

Healthy resolutions can keep your teeth healthy, and any of the following strategies will go a long way toward giving you a brighter, healthier smile in the coming year:

Ditch the Tobacco – this highly addictive substance is one of the worse vices you can have. Using a product filled with toxins and carcinogens (cigarettes) often causes bad breath, tooth-staining and will put you at an increased risk of developing conditions such as oral cancer, heart disease and dental problems such as tooth decay and gum disease.

Eat Right – eating well is important to maintaining your dental health. Poor nutrition affects the entire immune system, thus putting you at a great risk for many common oral disorders including gum disease.

Brush! Brush! Brush! – brushing and flossing protect your teeth from decay and most importantly, plaque. Without proper brushing and flossing, you may develop bleeding gums, which may worsen to severely swollen, red, bleeding gums (gingivitis) and, eventually gum disease.

Utilize Preventative Dentistry – receiving dental care prior to any dental problem arising is crucial in maintaining a bright, healthy smile. During your regular check-ups, we provide professional cleaning that removes harmful plaque and gingivitis before is develops into periodontal disease. Not only can preventative procedures stop issues from arising, it is also a great way to save money! In fact, studies have shown that for every $1 spent on preventative dental care, you’d spend $8 to $50 on restorative care.

Let’s have a great 2015!

Good oral health habits not only promote healthy teeth and a beautiful smile, it also contributes to your overall health. You owe a lot to your teeth and gums! Do them a favor this New Year by practicing excellent dental health habits and smile big in 2015!

If we can answer any questions or help in any way, visit our website at http://www.brunnerfamilydental.com to contact us and we’ll be happy to help.

Your Friends at Brunner Family Dental