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Hello Friends!

We often receive questions regarding dental x-rays; “Are they necessary?”, “Are they safe?”, and “Why do I need so many?” are typically the most common.  We found this great article from Delta Dental that had some great information from the ADA regarding dental x-rays.

All about x-rays

X-rays explained

Dental x-rays are a valuable part of dental treatment because they can detect damage to teeth and gums not visible during a routine checkup.

X-rays can show the condition of your teeth, their roots, your jaw placement and the overall composition of your facial bones. X-rays can help your dentist determine the presence or degree of gum disease, cavities, abscesses and many abnormal growths, such as cysts and tumors. X-rays also can show the exact location of impacted teeth and teeth that have not yet fully developed.

X-ray Q&A

Do all patients have x-rays taken every six months?

X-ray schedules are customized to fit your individual needs. If you are a new patient, your dentist will typically take x-rays to evaluate your oral health and track it during future visits, making sure that your teeth and gums stay healthy. If you have changed dentists and recently had x-rays taken, you can ask to have them sent to the new dentist so he or she is up-to-date on your oral health.

What kind of x-rays does my dentist usually take?

The most common type of x-rays dentists take are known as bitewing x-rays. These require patients to hold or bite down on a piece of plastic with x-ray film in the center. Bitewing x-rays typically determine the presence of decay in between teeth – one of the most common areas where decay-causing bacteria reside.

Periapical x-rays are another common type of dental x-ray, which gives the dentist an image of the entire tooth, including the roots. With periapical x-rays, dentists evaluate a particular tooth’s root structure and bone level, and also can detect cysts and abscesses.

My dentist has ordered a “panoramic radiograph.” What is that?

A panoramic x-ray, also called radiograph, allows your dentist to see your whole mouth, including your upper and lower teeth and parts of your jaw, in a single image. This gives him or her a clear image of any issues that may be harder to see up close. It can help predict children’s tooth development and may show complications with a teenager’s wisdom teeth before they erupt.

Why might I need more than one type of x-ray?

Different types of x-rays give your dentist an overview of different parts of your mouth. Panoramic x-rays give your dentist a general comprehensive view of your entire mouth on a single film, while bitewing or periapical x-rays show a detailed image of a smaller area, revealing decay or cavities between teeth. If your dentist needs both these vantage points to assess a problem, he or she will likely conduct multiple x-rays.

Should I be concerned about exposure to radiation?

All health care providers are sensitive to patients’ concerns about radiation. Your dentist has been trained to prescribe x-rays only when they are appropriate, and to tailor their frequency to your individual needs. By using state-of-the-art technology and staying knowledgeable about recent advances, your dentist knows which techniques, procedures and x-ray films can minimize your exposure to radiation.1

 

If you have any other questions or need more info, please visit our website at http://www.brunnerfamilydental.com.  We’ll be happy to discuss your individual concerns.

Your friends at

Brunner Family Dental

The oral health information on this website is intended for educational purposes only. You should always consult a licensed dentist or other qualified health care professional for any questions concerning your oral health.

Hello Friends!

We came across a great article by Dr. Gary Vance from the “ahealthiermichigan” website. Hope you enjoy the following information.
The health benefits of an afternoon cup of tea have been well-documented. For example, a simple mug of green tea can improve heart health, boost your immune system and protect your body against cancer thanks to its high levels of antioxidants. But what you may not realize is that drinking tea can also benefit your teeth and gums. Here are just a few ways steeping some tea for a warm drink can improve your next dental visit:
•Reduces gum inflammation: Researchers have found that people who regularly drink green and black tea have healthier gums than those who don’t. They believe that the anti-inflammatory effects of the tea improve the harmful bacteria levels in the mouth.
•Strengthens teeth: Studies have shown that people who drink green tea are less likely to lose teeth as they age than those who don’t. They key here is drinking it without adding any sugar, since sugar can lead to tooth decay.
•Fights plaque build-up: Black tea affects a bacterial enzyme in your mouth that helps plaque stick around. Drink more of it and the plaque won’t be able to attach itself to your teeth.
•Disrupts oral cancer cells: A report by the Academy of General Dentistry showed that the antioxidants in green tea can stop the growth of oral cancer cells and even kill them. It’s still too early for this to be considered an effective stand-alone cancer treatment, but it shows the far-reaching impact tea can have on your dental health.
•Freshens breath: Research shows that drinking green tea can also help reduce bad breath. The polyphenols in the green tea modify the bad-smelling sulfur components in your mouth.

About Dr. Gary Vance
Dr. Vance has been a practicing dentist for more than 35 years and is currently a dental associate at a private practice in Plymouth, Mich. He graduated from the University of Detroit’s School of Dentistry and is a member of the American Dental Association, Michigan Dental Association, Detroit District Dental Society and the American Association of Dental Consultants. Dr. Vance has been a dental consultant for Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan for the past 15 years and is the newest blogger for A Healthier Michigan.
http://www.bcbsm.com/index/health-insurance-help/faqs/plan-types/dental.html

Thanks to Dr. Vance for the great information!

I hope you enjoyed this month’s article. As always, if you are in the Pinckney, MI area, stop in to say hello.

Your friends at
Brunner Family Dental
http://www.brunnerfamilydental.com

Tagged WITH dentist, healthy gums, mouth, oral health, Tea